PAA History – 1960s

1990s / 1980s / 1970s / 1960s



Several PAA “old timers” on a reunion ride in February of 2008. — Photo by Charlie McTaggart



A pin PAA members wore. My guess is the red rose symbolizes the Rose Bowl and the olympic rings represent the olympic tradition within PAA. — Photo by Matt Gunnell

1960’s “kids” jersey — Photo courtesy of Charlie McTaggart




Orval Hart finishes the Mt. Baldy race — Photo courtesy of Orval Hart




From right (front to back with faces showing): Kim Bottles, John Potoshnick, Ron Skarin, and Orval Hart (in PAA colors) at an unknown Rose Bowl Race. — Photo courtesy of Orval Hart



PAA
and others in a pile up at the San Diego Recruit Depot Criterium — Photo courtesy of Orval Hart

 
Orval Hart launches Bill Kund at the Encino Velodrome — Photo courtesy of Orval Hart  


   
Orval Hart at the Milano Six Day races in the 1960s — Photo courtesy of Orval Hart

   

Rick Derby takes a sponge from Orval Hart (who had a mechanical) during the 1968 Olympic trials in the Kanan Road Race — Photo courtesy of Orval Hart



Click on the scan to read about Bill Kund winning the Rose Bowl Race sometime in the 1960s — Scan courtesy of Orval Hart



Click on the scan to read about PAA in the 1967 Rose Bowl Race — Scan courtesy of Orval Hart

 

Needs a story and names! Unknown if 1960’s or 70’s! — Photo courtesy of Charles McTaggart



I think this is Charlie. Unknown if 1960’s or 70’s! — Photo courtesy of Charles McTaggart  


I think this is Charlie. Unknown if 1960’s or 70’s! — Photo courtesy of Charles McTaggart
 
Charlie McTaggart on a climb at the Rose Bowl Race! — Photo courtesy of Charles McTaggart

 

1963 Front — Photo by Bob Peoples

1963 Back — Photo by Bob Peoples


PAA
goes 1, 2 at Solvang in 1966 with Dave Christopher and Bob Parsons. — Photo courtesy of the Pasadena Museum of History.



“This is me in my solo break in the 1964 Manhattan Beach Grand Prix, which at that time was a points race, with a sprint every five laps. I crossed the finish line a minute ahead of the peleton, but I only got third place, based on points.” — Photo and quote from Bob Peoples



“Me after the 1964 Ortega Highway road race. I hit a spectator in the sprint finish, but I didn’t fall.” — Photo and quote from Bob Peoples



“Three PAA riders in the 1963 State Road Championship in Santiago Canyon, Orange County: Bob Parsons (left), Bill Lawlor foreground and me in the back, with the grimace. Parsons was on the 1963 Pan Am and 1968 Olympic teams; he also won Nevada City 5 times. He received a suspension in this race for loudly calling a wheel-sucker a “son of a bitch” at the finish line.” — Photo and quote from Bob Peoples. Below is Bob Parsons today (blue jersey) riding with Victor Vincente of America. — Photo courtesy of Robert Adelman



“Jack Bennett, in the foreground during the 1963 Paramount criterium. Jack would join PAA later in the year, and he went on to place third in the 1967 U.S. National Championship road race. To Jack’s right, in the California State Championship jersey is Jack Disney, who was on many Pan Am and Olympic Teams. Jack Disney took 5th place in the match sprints in the 1956 Melbourne Olympics.” — Photo and quote from Bob Peoples



1969 Front — Photo by Ernie Hoffer



1969 Back — Photo by Ernie Hoffer


Kim Bottles in the 1960s (unknown year) and climbing Alpe d’Huez in 2005— Photos provided by Kim Bottles



Rick Derby at the 1968 Track Nationals (and Olympic Trials) at the Encino Velodrome — Photo Uncredited   History summary: Don Drageset purchased an interest in his father Norm’s bike shop (John’s) in 1961 at the age of 21. Within a year or so Don re-ignited the Pasadena Cycling Club which had been run by his father in the 30’s and 40’s. At the time, there was a multi-sport athletic club in Pasadena called the “Pasadena Athletic Association.” “The” PAA asked Don if the bike club would like to affiliate with it in order to expand the options of the bike club. By affiliating with the PAA, the bike club would have more money and options to attend national and international level events as the PAA was a non-profit organization with a board of directors and such. Don agreed and the Pasadena Cycling Club moved under the umbrella of the Pasadena Athletic Association. The relationship worked well for a few years until the Pasadena Athletic Association ended up going into debt sending track and field athletes to more events than they could pay for. The cycling portion of the PAA bailed out the club and paid down the debt by selling programs at Rose Bowl football games. Kim Bottles recalls spending many a weekend hawking programs in front of the Bowl wearing a light blue track suit emblazoned with PASADENA across the chest. Because the cyclists bailed out the organization, they ended up being the “last man standing” and by the end of the 1960’s the PAA was essentially the PAA Cycling Club. It still exists in this format today.    

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